Marbled Rye Bread

About a month ago I had this idea to make this kind of bread. I thought it might be a good compliment to a dish I was making that was German (Bavarian) in style. I first looked in a cookbook we had – the Better Homes and Gardens New Cookbook Bridal Edition – as I had recalled that there was a recipe like that in there. And yep, there was. Sadly, I forgot about it and didn’t have the time to make it given the time it takes (two separate rises). But I kept it in the back of my mind to make. I had everything anyway so I could do it whenever. And finally I did. 

I actually got off the fence about making it as I had another recipe that I wanted to use this bread for. More on that recipe later. I’ve written the recipe out below. Overall, I was very happy with how this turned out. Both rises went better than expected. (If you recall, I seem to have problems with bread rising.) Although the dough with the rye and molasses didn’t rise as well as the other portion. This was evident in the first rise. It wasn’t as evident in the second rise but as I cut into the bread more I found a “hole” where I think everything rose except the rye portion which left an empty space. 

But the taste was good and it worked well for everything I’ve used it for so far – toast, grilled cheese, regular sandwich bread, etc. And while I haven’t been making my own bread as often as I used to, this might need to be made occasionally. Oh, and despite it being a rye bread (well, partly anyway), it didn’t really taste like it. 

The only “problem” I had with it was that the directions were a little confusing. It told me two different times to “add as much of the remaining all purpose flour as possible”. Well, how is that possible. What happens if I add all the extra flour the first time and there isn’t any for the second time?  Ultimately I came up with a plan. 

It calls for 3 to 3 1/2 cups of all purpose flour and you use 2 right off the bat. That leaves about 1 1/2 cups as the extra. You are supposed to split the dough (which I did by weighing it out – about 11 ounces per half). To one half you automatically add 1 1/4 cups of rye flour. And then “as much of” the all purpose as you can. Well, to the over half I added 1 cup of all purpose and part of another quarter cup during the kneading process. I felt like that was pretty equal given the rye flour that was going into the one half. To the rye half, I added a quarter cup of the all purpose and then the rest of the other quarter cup during the kneading process. 

It worked out but in hindsight I think I would have added more to the non-rye portion. The rye portion turned out pretty stiff which could be from the extra flour. It was already pretty stiff without any of the all purpose flour. And that may have contributed to the lack of rise.  

Oh, and I used my stand mixer with a paddle attachment. One that has a rubber edge to scrap the bowl on its own (best thing ever).

  • 3 to 3 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 package active dry yeast 
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons dark-flavored molasses 
  • 1 1/4 cups rye or whole wheat flour

In a large mixing bowl, combine 2 cups of all purpose flour and the yeast. In a saucepan heat the milk, sugar, oil and salt until just warm. Add milk mixture to flour mixture. Beat with an electric mixer on low speed (“stir” on mine) for 30 seconds, scraping the bowl constantly. Beat on high speed for 3 minutes. 

Dv idea dough in half. To one portion, stir in as much of the remaining all purpose flour as you can. Turn out dough on to a floured work surface. Knead in enough of the all purpose flour to make a moderately stiff dough that is smooth and elastic. Shape into a ball. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease the surface of the dough. 

To the other portion, stir in molasses, rye flour, and as much of the remaining all purpose flour as you can. Turn out on to a floured work surface. Knead in enough of the all purpose flour to make a moderately stiff dough that is smooth and elastic. Shape into a ball. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease the surface of the dough. Cover both dough portions and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour. 

Punch both portions down. Cover and let rest 10 minutes. Meanwhile, grease an 8x4x2 inch loaf pan. 

On a lightly floured surface roll each dough portion into a 12×8 inch rectangle. Place dark dough on top of light dough. Roll up, starting from short side. Place seam side down in prepared pan. Cover and let rise until nearly doubled, about 30-40 minutes. 

Bake at 375 degrees for 30-35 minutes or until bread sounds hollow when lightly tapped. If necessary, tent with foil during last 10 minutes to prevent over browning. Immediately remove from pan and cool. 

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